Sneed Hill


Nicholas Sneed Hill

(1865-1937)

N. S. Hill

Known as Sneed, Nicholas Sneed Hill was born in Dawson and his family moved to Waco when he was still a small boy. One of his relatives, Joseph Sneed, was considered to be the first preacher in Waco Village.

Sneed Hill and Brothers circa 1883 in west Texas
Sneed Hill and Brothers circa 1883 in west Texas

Sneed and his brother. BH Hill, ran a successful printing business. After building it up, the brothers sold their business and shifted gears by entering the plumbing industry where they again enjoyed prosperity. Their plumbing business grew until it was well known across the state. They installed the fixtures for some of Waco’s most iconic buildings: the post office, the Raleigh hotel, the Shrine building, the Courthouse, various Waco schools,  and others. Hill Brothers plumbing was headquartered at 705 Austin Avenue. They provided all sorts of appliances and had the capacity to manufacture just about any sort of fixture necessary. In a 1928 interview celebrating Waco progress, Sneed was quoted:

“I would much rather not get a job, than to turn out something that would not stand the test of years. It is a matter of pride with us. We have been attempting to do perfect work in plumbing and installation of heating for 34 years. We never have made any attempt to be the cheapest. Our aim is to be the best. Since we opened business in Waco, I have believed in the possibilities of this territory. I believe sincerely that Texas has one of the greatest futures in this nation. Waco is due some real prosperity now. The building program which is now on should continue, and will continue if people of this district keep up the same progressive and forward attitude with which they have coped with every civic movement during the last three months.”

At Austin Avenue Methodist Church, Sneed Hill was well-known and very active. He was a team leader with Waco’s Y.M.C.A. Sneed Hill PlumbingHill Plumbing He rose to the East of 92 naturally and was among the core group that brought the Grand Lodge to Waco. He died on the anniversary of Waco 92’s charter, January 23, in 1937.